Fantasy to Insanity

Delusion leads to complete loss of actuality, resulting in their ultimate downfall. The truth is regularly denied simply by allowing lies and deceit to encompass a situation, leading to the bogus appearance of your positive and successful lifestyle.  In the play A Streetcar Called Desire by Tennessee Williams, the main character, Blanche, allows illusion to defeat reality ultimately causing complete madness. Arthur Callier develops an analogous situation throughout his play, Death of a Jeweler. Conflict shows both characters' true emotions, revealing the truth behind their lies and deceit. Significance helps the characters' to further express their outlook on life throughout the eyes of insanity. Topic ultimately discloses the characters' mental claims through all their personal wants, and is placed which solid shadows after their unsatisfying realities. Blanche and Willy are patients of insanity portrayed through theme, symbols, and turmoil. Conflict enables Blanche and Willy to elude reality and express their allayed emotions toward themselves and their relatives. Both characters make an attempt to mask their particular insanity by blaming their families for their pitfalls. Blanche sets the blame of her misplaced dream on her sister, Stella artois lager, since "[she was] the one that abandoned Superbe Reve, not really [Blanche]! [Blanche] stayed at for it, brousse for it, practically died to get it” (Williams 25). Willy raises superb expectations of his boy, Biff, through his unreachable illusions, then when failure methods, Willy understands " what a ridiculous lie [his] expereince of living has been” (Miller 104). Both Blanche and Willy put their own happiness and success ahead of their families. Their particular illusions have got led them to believe their loved ones are capable of becoming better, and when expectations are generally not met, various conflicts take place. These characters relieve their particular wrongdoings by simply unknowingly blaming their loved ones because of their failures, displaying their psychotic state of minds. Their particular obsessive behaviour towards confusion are significant...

Cited: Burns, Arthur, and Gerald Clifford Weales. Death of a sales person. New York: Penguin Books,

mil novecentos e noventa e seis. Print.

Williams, Tennessee.  A streetcar named Desire. Nyc: New Directions, 1947. Print out.